Sprintic Magazine

Subscribe to the Sprintic Magazine Newsletter and receive track and field news, articles, training descriptions, photo and video sections updates. We have 1800+ subscribers already!

News




Tyson Gay nearly blows by 100-meter world record

3 June 2007
www.wcsn.com

By Elliot Denman

Zero-point-two meters per second.

What's that? A mini-whiff. A baby of a breeze. A mini-mini gust. In everyday terms, practically zilch. But in track and field terms, 0.2 seconds translates to "absolutely humongous."

Just ask Tyson Gay.

The former University of Arkansas speedster blazed to a 9.76-second victory in the 100-meter dash at the Reebok Grand Prix track and field meet Saturday night before a capacity crowd of 4,990 fans at Icahn Stadium on Randalls Island. It would have been a world record but for those 0.2 seconds.

The fans went wild when Gay's time of 9.76 was flashed onto the Icahn electronic scoreboards. But they soon calmed down when another scoreboard delivered the bad news -- Gay had a wind of 2.20 meters per second at his back. And the legal limit of eligibity for world records, of course, is precisely two meters per second.

The fans went wild when Gay's time of 9.76 was flashed onto the Icahn electronic scoreboards. But they soon calmed down when another scoreboard delivered the bad news -- Gay had a wind of 2.20 meters per second at his back. And the legal limit of eligibity for world records, of course, is precisely two meters per second.

Gay wasn't totally distraught over the nullifying wind reading. He had an inkling of it before the race even began.

"When I was in the blocks, I could feel the wind pick up," he said. "I thought, 'Come on, die down.' It did but not enough."

And what did he say when he saw the wind reading?

"Shoot," he alleged. Or something close.

Coming two weeks after he'd run 9.79 in Carson, Calif., the 9.76 wasn't totally shocking to him. He obviously knew he was in the type of superb shape that could get him to the finish line in spectacular time. Now he just has to find a no-gust zone.

Gay's 9.76 was 1/100th of a second faster than the official world record (9.77) shared by Jamaican Asafa Powell and American Justin Gatlin. And it was the second fastest 100 ever run under any conditions -- outdone only by the 9.69 (some say hurricane-aided) performance by Obadele Thompson of Barbados at El Paso, Tex., in 1996.

Ethiopian distance runner Tirunesh Dibaba, Chinese high hurdler Liu Xiang, and U.S. sprinters Allyson Felix and Wallace Spearmon felt frustrations of their own.

But Jenn Stuczynski considered the meet a huge leap forward. Stuczynski, out of tiny Roberts Wesleyan College in upstate New York, raised the American women's pole vault record to 4.88 meters, or precisely 16 feet, before missing three attempts at the world-record height of 5.01 meters.

On the all-time world charts, only Russia's Yelena Isinbenayeva, the world record-holder at 5.01, now outranks Stuczysnki.

Nine runners broke 4:00 in the heralded men's mile. Alan Webb led them all in 3:52.94, besting two-fime Olympic 1,500-meter medalist Bernard Lagat (3:53.88) along with Aussie Craig Mottram (3:54.54) and New Zealander Nick Willis (3:55.09).

Dibaba, the 2005 world champion at 5,000 and 10,000 meters, cruised to a 14:35.67 win in the women's 5,000 meters. She missed the world record of 14:24.53 set by compatriot Meseret Defar at the 2006 Reebok meet.

Xiang, who set the world record of 12.88 in the 110-meter hurdles last year in Lausanne, Switzerland, fought off American rivals Terrence Trammell (12.95), Ryan Wilson (13.02) and David Payne (13.15).

Felix won the women's 400 in 50.53 after snaring third place in the 100, where she ran 11.01 but trailed Jamaica's Veronica Campbell, who ran 10.93, and American Torri Edwards, who ran 10.96.

Felix won the women's 400 in 50.53 after snaring third place in the 100, where she ran 11.01 but trailed Jamaica's Veronica Campbell, who ran 10.93, and American Torri Edwards, who ran 10.96.

Americans swept both discus throwing events with Jarred Rome leading the men with a 66.84-meter toss and Becky Breisch topping the women's field at 61.96.

"I'm throwing the best of my career," said Rome. "The throw I had today would medal at worlds [August's World Championships in Osaka, Japan]."

Next stop for much of the Reebok Grand Prix cast will be the traditional Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Ore., next Sunday. Then the Americans will be on to the USA Nationals (June 21-24) in Indianapolis, where the U.S. team bound for Osaka will be chosen.



Bookmark and share this story:

 Facebook

 del.icio.us

 Netscape

 Digg


Complete Speed Training

The FIRST and ONLY All-Inclusive, Step by Step, Speed Development Program to Show You Exactly How to Make Your Athletes Faster and More a Athletic Than the Competition!



DVD #1: Pre Competition
DVD #2: Agility Training
DVD #3: Hardcore Conditioning
DVD #4: High Powered Training
DVD #5: Pure Speed Training


- Quick and easy methods for getting more done in less time so you can focus on the skills specific to your sport.

- Easy to understand and apply strategies for speed development.

- Clear progressions that can be used for beginner and advanced athletes at the same practice.

- Drills and exercises on video so you can see exactly how to perform and teach drills properly.

- Specific instructions detailing how, where and when to use each movement without having “to earn a degree in exercise science or biomechanics”

- Proven sample workouts and programs you can instantly bring to practice – the same day your program arrives


Order Now